Smart motorways drive away classic car owners?

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mab01uk
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Smart motorways drive away classic car owners?

Post by mab01uk »

Classic car owners are taking detours to avoid smart motorways for fear of being hit from behind while stopped in live lanes.
Drivers of cars older than 25 years said motorways without a hard shoulder have ‘too many risks’ because their vehicles’ age makes them particularly susceptible to breaking down.
AA chief Edmund King said the Government and National Highways should ‘go back to the drawing board’ and return the inside lane of all-lane-running smart motorways to being a hard shoulder.
Alan Hames, who was a highways engineer for more than 50 years before retiring, said he takes detours to avoid smart motorways when driving his 1972 Jaguar E-Type. He added 26 miles to a return trip from his home in Northamptonshire to a recent car event in London by using the M40 – which has a hard shoulder – rather than the M1, which does not.
Breaking down on a smart motorway ‘brings too many risks for classic car owners’, the 80-year-old said. ‘I know many other classic car owners who take long detours to avoid these deadly smart motorway death traps. At least a hard shoulder gives drivers the option of getting to relative safety.’
Gaynor Cauter, editor of Jaguar Driver magazine, said: ‘I hear regularly from drivers of Jaguars – classic and modern – who are so frightened of breaking down on smart motorways that they make every effort to avoid them, and I include myself in that number,’ she said.
‘However, on some journeys, they are almost impossible to avoid.’
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/articl ... wners.html
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johnv
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Re: Smart motorways drive away classic car owners?

Post by johnv »

I never drive my minis on motorways these days. The modern 4x4 behemoths insulate their drivers so much from their surroundings that its just plain dangerous especially in adverse conditions.
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Exminiman
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Re: Smart motorways drive away classic car owners?

Post by Exminiman »

johnv wrote: Wed Dec 28, 2022 10:34 am I never drive my minis on motorways these days. The modern 4x4 behemoths insulate their drivers so much from their surroundings that its just plain dangerous especially in adverse conditions.
So true, I think the psychology is that the drivers feel too safe, somehow disconnected from any potential risk of an accident, the car will save me…… no matter what…..

In a similar vain, we watched these YouTube videos of Rufford Ford totally shocked ,by some of the drivers, they are effectively just driving into the river, maybe following SatNav, its just blind confidence, as you say dangerous….

https://youtu.be/Y1HHFXFN788

EDIT: If you search Rufford on YouTube, there are loads of vids….. :lol:
Last edited by Exminiman on Wed Dec 28, 2022 11:19 am, edited 1 time in total.
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snoopy64
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Re: Smart motorways drive away classic car owners?

Post by snoopy64 »

I’ll be honest, I don’t mind a standard motorway as I feel I’ve always got ‘somewhere to go’ but the A34 Winchester to the M40 now that’s a different story..don’t like that at all, 2 lanes, plenty of lorries and everything else doing 70plus :o

Smart motorways are nervy even in my day to day driving…
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surfblue63
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Re: Smart motorways drive away classic car owners?

Post by surfblue63 »

These Jag drivers must be a bag of nerves driving on a dual carriageway, let alone on a single carriageway with traffic coming in both directions.

If you think your car is going to breakdown then you shouldn't start your journey in it. Just stay at home, put your slippers on and read the Express or The Mail.

By the way, if anything that weighs 2.5 tonnes rear ends you at 70, no matter what your are in, it will be crushed.

The following contains footage of the result of a Honda CRV hitting a Perodua Myvi. It is eye opening.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CY168dB2bF4

This video contains scenes that some may find distressing.
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mab01uk
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Re: Smart motorways drive away classic car owners?

Post by mab01uk »

surfblue63 wrote: Wed Dec 28, 2022 1:27 pm These Jag drivers must be a bag of nerves driving on a dual carriageway, let alone on a single carriageway with traffic coming in both directions.

If you think your car is going to breakdown then you shouldn't start your journey in it. Just stay at home, put your slippers on and read the Express or The Mail.
Don't agree with all your points....most single carriageways and dual carriageways may not have a hard shoulder but there are nearly always grass verges, pavements, cycle tracks, side roads, lay-bys, bus stops, driveways to pull over into and get off the carriageway. On smart motorways there is just a barrier and if you are lucky at a distance a layby/refuge (if not already occupied by a large lorry, etc). No one can predict if their car is going to break down or get a puncture before they start their journey! When stranded by the nearside 'smart' barrier in live lane how do you open your passenger side doors to exit....especially with young children or senior aged passengers needing to get out quickly as lorries bear down?
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surfblue63
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Re: Smart motorways drive away classic car owners?

Post by surfblue63 »

The point is, it is not the roads that are unsafe, it is the poor standards of driving, the poor maintenance of vehicles and the total lack of any retraining that drivers require to drive on the roads.
There are a lot of types of work were your are required to take tests after a certain amount of time. Just to work on a building site in any role you have to take a theory test on health and safety every 5 years. I think everyone should, at least, take a driving theory test every five years, but it would be better if they had a practical test too. The last time I did a vehicle test was in 1995 when I passed my motorcycle test, and the last time my driving was assessed was in 1998 when I thought about becoming a driving instructor. I have never done a theory test for driving, but I have had to do numerous theory tests so I can go and work on a building site and sit in an office and not use any heavy equipment.
Unfortunately the Smart Motorways have been much maligned because they had some flaws in the design and usage, but I think they are just as dangerous as any other non-motorway roads. Plenty of drivers just ignore the red Xs when posted in lanes, is that the fault of the road? Plenty also ignore the posted speed limits on the gantries, is that the fault of the road?
The first bit of Smart Motorway that I used regularly was the M42, south of Birmingham. This was a nightmare of a road before the Smart Motorway was installed, but after it was much better as the traffic was slowed to a speed that prevented the stop start wave that would occur with the unrestricted 70mph limit. At rush hour it could take 45 minutes or more to get from teh M6 junction to the M40 junction. With the Smart Motorway installed and working it usually take less than 30 minutes, sometimes less than 20 to get through.

Unfortunately Smart Motorways are being ridiculed because of the knee jerk reaction of The Daily Mail to someone if the Jag owners club who probably did their driving test back in 1962.

Finally, very very few breakdowns cause a car to be immobile, but, unfortunately, a lot of drivers are not confident enough to drive a car a short distance when it has developed a fault and get themselves to a place of safety. The last time I had a rapid deflation was on the A42 between Donington and Tamworth. t was on the nearside rear. I slowed with hazards on a drove to the next lay-by. I could have stopped immediately, but I would have been in a live lane with a posted limit of 70mph without the luxury of monitored CCTV and overhead warning signs. Why did I not pull onto the verge, well most of them are soft and render a jack useless.
Last edited by surfblue63 on Wed Dec 28, 2022 5:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Exminiman
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Re: Smart motorways drive away classic car owners?

Post by Exminiman »

surfblue63 wrote: Wed Dec 28, 2022 4:59 pm The point is, it is not the roads that are unsafe, it is the poor standards of driving, the poor maintenance of vehicles and the total lack of any retraining that drivers require to drive on the roads.
There are a lot of types of work were your are required to take tests after a certain amount of time. Just to work on a building site in any role you have to take a theory test on health and safety every 5 years. I think everyone should, at least, take a driving theory test every five years, but it would be better if they had a practical test too. The last time I did a vehicle test was in 1995 when I passed my motorcycle test, and the last time my driving was assessed was in 1998 when I thought about becoming a driving instructor. I have never done a theory test for driving, but I have had to do numerous theory tests so I can go and work on a building site and sit in an office and not use any heavy equipment.
Unfortunately the Smart Motorways have been much maligned because they had some flaws in the design and usage, but I think they are just as dangerous as any other non-motorway roads. Plenty of drivers just ignore the red Xs when posted in lanes, is that the fault of the road? Plenty also ignore the posted speed limits on the gantries, is that the fault of the road?
The first bit of Smart Motorway that I used regularly was the M42, south of Birmingham. This was a nightmare of a road before the Smart Motorway was installed, but after it was much better as the traffic was slowed to a speed that prevented the stop start wave that would occur with the unrestricted 70mph limit. At rush hour it could take 45 minutes or more to get from teh M6 junction to the M40 junction. With the Smart Motorway installed and working it usually take less than 30 minutes, sometimes less than 20 to get through.

Unfortunately Smart Motorways are being ridiculed because of the knee jerk reaction of The Daily Mail to someone if the Jag owners club who probably did their driving test back in 1962.
Seriously? would you want to be an AA man (any recovery person) recovering a broken down car on a Smart Motorway ?

EDIT: thought would try and find an unbiased (as far as can) view on the internet. https://yougov.co.uk/topics/travel/arti ... -motorways

Granted though, just because people think it, it doesn't make it true….

PS I do not read the Daily mail either :lol:
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surfblue63
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Re: Smart motorways drive away classic car owners?

Post by surfblue63 »

I wouldn't want to be an AA man recovering a car from a two lane dualled A road either.

My point is Smart Motorways are no more dangerous than any other non-Motorway dual carriageway, but they do have monitored CCTV and overhead illuminated signage.


PS I don't think the AA would recover you from a live lane, I think they would wait for the Highways Agency people to tow you to a place of safety.
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tweedy998
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Re: Smart motorways drive away classic car owners?

Post by tweedy998 »

My thoughts on this are; if you have a well maintained classic that you are confident of driving then any sort of roadway should not be a cause for concern or one to be avoided.

That said, sometimes if I'm route planning I will choose to plot a course which takes in A and B roads over motorway sections, purely because they offer a much more involving and enjoyable driving and travelling (scenery, interesting places to stop for pictures, coffee etc) experience. Sometimes though, that's not always practical, so there will nearly always be some sort of motorway stint on a longer journey, and the ones near us are virtually all of the 'smart' variety. I've not found it an issue, as the performance of our 998 Cooper is more than capable of being part of modern traffic, and I'm confident in the mechanicals of the car to complete the journey.

I've not read the linked article, but the few quotes from it in the OP do strike me a little of one of those over-sensationalised Daily Mail items.
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