Rust converters

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Sixbangerlandcrab
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Joined: Mon Jan 02, 2017 6:33 pm

Re: Rust converters

Post by Sixbangerlandcrab »

I used Bilt Hamber deox-c inside a fuel tank and found it to be good although I found dissolving the powder in water a little bizarre! Rustbuster's treatments worked well for me too, used on my daily driver before a respray and had no rust trouble since.
Some day when I'm older, I hope the Good Lord preserves me to have a huge dose of crabs
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Spider
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Joined: Mon May 07, 2012 6:10 am
Location: Big Red, Australia

Re: Rust converters

Post by Spider »

A couple of years back I gave Evaporust a go after a few suggested it here. I found it was good and fast, but the solution looses it's zing very fast.

Recently I tried Metal Rescue and while slower than Evaporust, I found it very good and it doesn't seem to loose it's 'zing'. I initially bought it to remove a rusted in piston from a bore. It did that in a few hours and had no effect or reaction of the alloy of the piston. I've a small container on the bench that I have been dropping the odd part in to over the past couple of months and while it looks black and manky it still works well. It doesn't seem to harm non-ferrous metals either, I've dropped some parts in that have bushes etc and they don't seem bothered by it.
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850man
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Joined: Fri Nov 09, 2012 12:08 pm
Location: Melbourne, Australia.

Re: Rust converters

Post by 850man »

A mate of mine is an industrial chemist and gave me this little bottle of Phosphoric acid a while ago to clean out fuel tanks.
Mixed with the appropriate ratio of water it works brilliantly, dissolving rust and crud.
And your hands if you don't wear gloves.
If you can buy straight Phosphoric acid then do it, its the base ingredient in most commercial rust converters and without all the rest of the crap they add, works far better.
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InnoCooperExport
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Joined: Tue Mar 31, 2020 8:44 pm
Location: The Netherlands

Re: Rust converters

Post by InnoCooperExport »

like 850man said, most of the rust converters are Phosphoric acid, the ones without are generally citric acid (like Bilthamber's Deox-C) which you can buy neat from health shops and more hippy dippy places for making your own jams and preserves, for a lot less than Deox-C. Phosphoric acid however is more effective and a bit harder to get, and I'm not sure it's even available for consumers, which is maybe a good thing...
Of course I know what a dipstick is, you get called something often enough you look it up!
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Spider
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Joined: Mon May 07, 2012 6:10 am
Location: Big Red, Australia

Re: Rust converters

Post by Spider »

InnoCooperExport wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 11:18 am ,,,,most of the rust converters are Phosphoric acid,,,,,
Some are and it is effective. I used to had a bath for doing heads and blocks. The products I've mentioned about aren't Phosphoric Acid Based. I do know that Metal Rescue isn't classed and toxic and is quite harmless to the skin. There's no odor from it either. The Acids work well, but are easily 'upset' from contaminates are are a PITA to dispose of. Metal Rescue is safe and fine to pour down the sink to disposed of it. I haven't looked at the MSDS for it to see what's in it, but I can't see myself rushing back to Acids anytime soon.
Polarsilver
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Re: Rust converters

Post by Polarsilver »

Bilt Hamber Deox-C .. that i used as a rust remover within a steel 90 ltr Audi URq Fuel Tank .. worked a Treat . ;)
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