It’s looking like 2030 for E-day

General Chat with an emphasis on BMC Minis & Other iconic cars of the 1960's. Includes information on MK1 Action days.
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SMOKE GREY
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Re: It’s looking like 2030 for E-day

Post by SMOKE GREY »

I for my sins work for Porsche, who make a statement that of all the cars they have made in the last 70 years, 72% of them are still on the road :o They are 3 years into developing a new clean fuel to keep all classics running and to be widely available. Price per litre is currently high but they are confident this is going to be coming down. Be interesting to see, they are committed to it and already have a couple of their classics running on it.
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Pete
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Re: It’s looking like 2030 for E-day

Post by Pete »

MiNiKiN wrote: Wed Nov 18, 2020 11:46 am
Pete wrote: Wed Nov 18, 2020 11:33 am Imagine what’ll happen to the national grid when we all get electric cars and plug them all in at home after work. :lol: . Not that most people have off road parking anyway, or will be able to afford one.
Does the grid currently go down when all at the same time switch on their cookers at noon or after work?
They’ll be doing that ASWELL as charging all their cars, millions of us, that’s kind of the point I was making. ;)
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Pete
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Re: It’s looking like 2030 for E-day

Post by Pete »

EVs are one step towards a change in attidude where people have to realise that current individual transport (i.e. where everyone has his/her own car) is a thing from the past. You simply cannot motorise all the population in the world. Too less resources is just one of many reasons..
BTW: Sorry for my environmentalist and EV-expert me popping up - take care!

[/quote]

How does having an EV stop people having their own individual vehicles? I see no correlation.

Environmentalists rarely talk about air travel, one one of the biggest polluters, usually because I assume they’re not prepared to make sacrifices on that level, or talk about consumerism generally. It’s quite ironic to listen to people like Lewis Hamilton for example lecturing the peasants about pollution, a man with a bigger carbon footprint than your average town! I think commuter travel will drop anyway in the future as so many people will start to work from home, illustrated and brought on very much by the Covid lock downs. Either way a ban by 2030 I think is unrealistic, the battery range/ life, the cost, infrastructure and charging issues just will not be resolved by then and I expect strong resistance unless it is.
AndyPen
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Re: It’s looking like 2030 for E-day

Post by AndyPen »

MiNiKiN wrote: Wed Nov 18, 2020 10:36 am
AndyPen wrote: Wed Nov 18, 2020 12:12 am Just working out how to run my collection on cow farts - there will be a huge market I'm sure ;-)
I have in my mind's eye the many classic car owners on their nightly wanderings over meadows, collecting cow farts in huge plastic sacks to be made into petrol in their illicit cellar refinery. :mrgreen: :lol:

Doh! Gotta figure out how to make jute gas tight, as plastic bags are going to be banned by then too

BTW: I think the ICE new car sales ban is a good thing.
We may have a solution - scientists using bubble test systems suggest we may secure flatulence power in time, by capturing cow farts in bubbles. Boris has announced the experiments are ongoing amongst mini owners ;-)

flatulence-tests.jpg
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Exminiman
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Re: It’s looking like 2030 for E-day

Post by Exminiman »

Planes are an issue and also ships, not sure which to which Country the emissions from ships are attributed, if any, as most will sail under a flag of conveniance.

Here is a report from the BBC (AKA, The Guardian, these days :lol: ) , where its claimed that the shipping industry produces as much emissions as the whole of Germany. https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-43714029

I find this quite shocking that, it seems this is being ignored, because no one seems to be responsible for it, while the man in the street is being penalised.
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Spider
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Re: It’s looking like 2030 for E-day

Post by Spider »

Interesting discussion guys.

I can't help think that the drive towards EVs is largely political rather than anything technical or environmental. As already mentioned here, vehicles only contribute such small numbers in terms of pollution and adding to climate change - that 'thing' that's been changing for the last 4 billion + years. I haven't heard any of those who insist we wipe out IC Vehicles, in favour of EVs address the total product cycle and all the 'damage' that will do vs an IC vehicle.

There's clearly a strong drive to go all electric and it might reach that goal at some point, and there won't be any IC Vehicles made anywhere. That may well suit most of the world, however I can't see how the likes of us in Australia will get on. In cities, it's fine, we'd cope as well as anywhere else, but we have a huge country, the same land area as the US, but with a small population of circa 25 million, as a result, we have a great many areas that are unpopulated or have very low population and big distances in between, some in excess of 1000 km, and loads that are around 200 km between drinks. I guess they could build solar charging stations for these remote locations, wind would be useless but who's going to fund them and also look after them ? What if I arrived at say (the town of) Nullabor (population 50) on the last electron in my batteries only to find the charging station is out of order? The next town is around 300 km away and with a similar population so it would likely only have one 'filling' station too. For safety, these cars for us would have to have a range of 1000 km.

We also have a huge amount of freight trucked around the country and much of it to some very remote Cattle Stations and Communities. How will this work ?

EVs might well be feasible for much of the world, but on current technology and that as far as I can see in the future, will fall a very long way short to suit us and a small handful of other countries, who like us, won't be able to buy cars to get us around. It will drive Australia back to the stone age.
richardACS
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Re: It’s looking like 2030 for E-day

Post by richardACS »

What a great way to sabotage a country - 'chuck your bike over the fence' (thanks Michael) into the generating station and it puts out your lights, phones, transport, fridges, ovens and hot water well just about everything! :lol:
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mab01uk
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Re: It’s looking like 2030 for E-day

Post by mab01uk »

News reports are already suggesting the value of new and used petrol/diesel car is immediately dropping after the 2030 deadline announcement. Diesel car sales have already dropped due to environmental pressure and new emissions laws in recent years. I would think this is also going to make a lot of people hang on to the vehicle they already have for longer to see how things pan out before investing in another new or used car if not essential. That can't be good for the car industry already suffering from financial losses due to the Corona virus, especially if they don't have their production already geared up for a major switch in demand to hybrid and EV's. (An announcement earlier this year planned to ban the sale of new hybrid vehicles from 2035). While you won't have to scrap your ICE vehicle as soon as 2030 comes around, companies are rolling out scrappage schemes across the UK for high-emitting vehicles. Most offer money off a newer car that's less polluting, apparently Mazda is offering up to £5,500 off a new model if your car is registered before 31 December 2009. As before with the previous UK scrappage scheme how does scrapping a perfectly serviceable car manufactured before 2010 help the environment when we are told the manufacture and disposal of a car is one of the biggest parts of it carbon footprint?
swifty
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Re: It’s looking like 2030 for E-day

Post by swifty »

As I've said in a earlier post . The vehicles are not being scrapped under the scheme , as in taken apart and destroyed . They are going to third world countries and being used . I've had many scrap yards in earlier years and have dealt with exporters of our high emission scrap vans /HGVs . We used to get around the export laws by cutting the roofs off . They are then classed as spares and not a vehicle . ..This has been going on for years and still does .... ken
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scalino65
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Re: It’s looking like 2030 for E-day

Post by scalino65 »

SMOKE GREY wrote: Wed Nov 18, 2020 10:15 pm I for my sins work for Porsche, who make a statement that of all the cars they have made in the last 70 years, 72% of them are still on the road :o They are 3 years into developing a new clean fuel to keep all classics running and to be widely available. Price per litre is currently high but they are confident this is going to be coming down. Be interesting to see, they are committed to it and already have a couple of their classics running on it.
Thank you for mentioning this as I hadnt heard about it.
I found a bit more info here which might interest others.
https://www.automotiveworld.com/news-re ... tic-fuels/
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