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PostPosted: Fri Apr 13, 2018 9:27 pm 
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I’m 43, I’ve had my 1964 MK1 since I was 10 years old. One day I’ll finish it!!!


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 13, 2018 9:52 pm 
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mk1 wrote:
Looking long term I honestly don't see a great number of classic cars or for that matter interest in them.

Certainly within the next 50 years I strongly believe it will be a very, very niche interest. Look at a few indisputable facts.

1) Governments all over the world are talking about phasing out Petrol & Diesel. OK, it won't happen overnight but as soon as the huge current demand starts to drop, even a little, the number of outlets will decrease & the price will sky rocket. This won't have a huge effect initially, but it will be an inevitable ratchet over a fairly short number of years once it gets going. As the price of fuel goes up, it is inevitable that some people will be "priced out" of the hobby.

2) As driver-less cars become more the norm, something that I see as pretty much inevitable (I never thought I'd say that) . How these and driven cars interact will become a serious issue. The backlash against "dangerous" old cars driven by humans will begin. I can imagine how the Daily Mail will HOWL about selfish "Carbon Burners" putting children's lives at risk.

3) We have already passed Peak Driver. Certainly in the UK the number of people choosing to take a driving test at all has been declining since the late 1990's. As the urban population increases exponentially the need for a personal car for these urban dwellers is pretty much non existent. We have already seen moves to begin the expulsion of private cars from urban centres across Europe. The sensible course of action is reliance on public transport for day to day travel within a city, rail from urban centre to urban centre & private hire or vehicle hire for occasional "odd journeys".

4) Haven't you noticed that people at car shows are getting older! When I was first driving back in the early 80's, pretty much everyone of my age was messing around with old cars of one sort or another. Nowadays with Draconian insurance requirements & extortionate costs, the relatively high performance / efficiency of even the most mundane Granny car & a large number of young peoples apparent inability to do anything that doesn't exclusively involve a screen all reduce the pool of potential enthusiasts for the future.

5) Car's will just become more & more unacceptable. In the developed world cars are already portrayed as a problem where as 50 years ago they were the solution to a problem. I can remember care free drives down pretty much desolate motorways when I was a kid. To see any road with no cars on it nowadays is the exception to the rule, and we all spend far too much time in traffic jams. If the sort of numbers of cars that we are used to in the west are reproduced in the rest of the world then in no time flat there will be no petrol at all, but this won't be an issue as we will all have choked to death on exhaust fumes anyway.

I am NOT saying for one moment that things will change overnight, or not at the moment, anyway. But they will change and I sincerely believe that our obsession will become more & more of a niche interest as the years pass by.


All good points Mark, and I can't argue with most of them.

My optimistic side hopes that - if the trend toward electric vehicles and autonomous cars continues - that older historic "collector" cars will perhaps live as an exception to the general laws. Certainly things are a bit more regulated for you in the U.K. but I could see collector cars being allowed to drive X numbers per year etc. And if fuel really skyrockets in price, you really will only drive gasoline-powered vehicles for fun occasions.

I'd hate to see these old cars legislated off the road entirely - and end up as track-only vehicles (at god-knows-what fuel prices..). But it's hard to say.

My pessimistic (er, perhaps nihilistic) side says that we're all going to die eventually, dust-to-dust, ash-to-ash, so enjoy what you have and don't lose sleep over the future! :)


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 14, 2018 3:11 am 
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mk1 wrote:
It does make you wonder how these cars will be kept or how the classic car 'scene' will look in 20 years time.

It will just move on, most people will become less & less interested in the cars of the 60's & 70's, then the 80's on & on until practically no one gives a toss about car's any more & they are just remembered as a historical anachronism like putting kids up Chimneys or Sedan chairs.

Whether we like it or not, nearly all the cars we love will at some point end up either as iron oxide or melted down to make "something useful" instead.

That is assuming that Trump & Putin haven't reduced the entire globe to a giant smoking radioactive cinder long before.


Not sure I buy that. Once you reach the 80s and 90s the cars must aren't as interesting. They all start looking the same for the most part. So, my assumption is that as long as there are car enthusiasts they will flock to the 50s-70s.

And on your points 1-3 we've already adapted, haven't we/ Gone from leaded and some other past issues that would make a lot of old cars unusable today. So, things may change but the design will always be an attraction.

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 14, 2018 3:15 am 
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Also, I'm going on 47 this month. Holy Shinoly, when did I get this close to 50? Get off my lawn you whippersnappers!!

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 14, 2018 7:28 am 
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The optimist in me says that 'classic' cars will eventually be protected and still be used and cherished by people that want to own / use them for what they are / were intended for rather than investments. Unfortunately (unless the younger generation learn how to maintain them) it may be that our hobby will become more and more out of reach of the average enthusiast as costs of having to pay someone to look after the cars escalate.

I also think the early 90's will be a sort of natural cut off date for self restored cars as most aren't too reliant on electronics to make them function. What will happen to my cars in the future, well I suppose that depends on the interest my Son shows in them, if he likes them for what they are rather than what they (may or may not) be worth then when I'm too old to play with them then he can keep them, if there's no interest perhaps they will all go to other homes, I hope I've got at least another 30 years of playing with them infront of me as I rapidly approach the big 50 :lol:


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 14, 2018 3:05 pm 
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mk1coopers wrote:
The optimist in me says that 'classic' cars will eventually be protected and still be used and cherished by people that want to own / use them for what they are / were intended for rather than investments. Unfortunately (unless the younger generation learn how to maintain them) it may be that our hobby will become more and more out of reach of the average enthusiast as costs of having to pay someone to look after the cars escalate.

I also think the early 90's will be a sort of natural cut off date for self restored cars as most aren't too reliant on electronics to make them function. What will happen to my cars in the future, well I suppose that depends on the interest my Son shows in them, if he likes them for what they are rather than what they (may or may not) be worth then when I'm too old to play with them then he can keep them, if there's no interest perhaps they will all go to other homes, I hope I've got at least another 30 years of playing with them infront of me as I rapidly approach the big 50 :lol:


I agree with all of the above Also a consideration is my perspective being an American. There may be fewer young folks in antique shops and in the classic car shows but there are enough that it will live. We are told that Millennials don't want a house out in the 'burbs and all that but the actual polls of the younger generation show that most indeed do want it.

I would note, however, that if your police continue to confiscate pliers and files then nobody will be able to maintain their classic cars :lol: You all have full arsenals in your garages, better watch out!

https://twitter.com/MPSRegentsPark/status/974645778558980096/photo/1?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw&ref_url=https%3A%2F%2Ftwitchy.com%2Fbrettt-3136%2F2018%2F04%2F09%2Fomg-take-a-look-at-these-weapons-found-by-british-police-during-a-sweep%2F

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 14, 2018 6:53 pm 
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Location: Up north where men are men and sheep are frightened
I'm 70 today (Paddy Hopkirk is 85) I didn't think when I started as an apprentice at a BMC garage in 1964 I would still be playing with minis 54 years later :lol:


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 14, 2018 7:29 pm 
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JohnA wrote:
I'm 70 today (Paddy Hopkirk is 85) I didn't think when I started as an apprentice at a BMC garage in 1964 I would still be playing with minis 54 years later :lol:


Snap (1yr and a bit older and 1yr earlier) :cry:


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 14, 2018 7:44 pm 
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zbarbera wrote:
I agree with all of the above Also a consideration is my perspective being an American. There may be fewer young folks in antique shops and in the classic car shows but there are enough that it will live. We are told that Millennials don't want a house out in the 'burbs and all that but the actual polls of the younger generation show that most indeed do want it.


+ 1 to that (speaking as an American Millennial with a house in the 'burbs).

I learned long ago to disregard all of the fake polls and sensationalist clickbait news from so-called experts about my generation. Speaking in broad strokes here, but Millennials largely inherited an economic recession and housing collapse that they had nothing to do with creating, and are then blamed for not "wanting" to make major life purchases like a home or new car. Hello - they couldn't afford those things for many years until the economy improved. I'm walking proof of this.

Rant over, as you were - :D


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 14, 2018 9:16 pm 
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Highnumbers wrote:
zbarbera wrote:
I agree with all of the above Also a consideration is my perspective being an American. There may be fewer young folks in antique shops and in the classic car shows but there are enough that it will live. We are told that Millennials don't want a house out in the 'burbs and all that but the actual polls of the younger generation show that most indeed do want it.


+ 1 to that (speaking as an American Millennial with a house in the 'burbs).

I learned long ago to disregard all of the fake polls and sensationalist clickbait news from so-called experts about my generation. Speaking in broad strokes here, but Millennials largely inherited an economic recession and housing collapse that they had nothing to do with creating, and are then blamed for not "wanting" to make major life purchases like a home or new car. Hello - they couldn't afford those things for many years until the economy improved. I'm walking proof of this.

Rant over, as you were - :D



Don’t blame us Gen-Xers for that. It’s all the fault of the damn Boomers :)

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