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PostPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2017 7:56 am 
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111Robin wrote:
Of all of the "retro" modern cars I quite like the Fiat 500, visually anyway, never driven one, seems closer to the original than most within the limits of modern design/safety requirements. Never liked the Mondeo Jaguars, that was definitely a bad choice by the marketing people although they did sell reasonably.


I have always liked the new 500s as well but never really liked to admit it. But then earlier this year had one as a rental car in Italy for a couple of weeks and it was great fun to drive on narrow costal roads. A bit gutless so had to rev the nuts off it, took me back to being 17 with my first 998 mini.

The mrs has just had an Abarth and I bloody love it! :D plenty of power for a little car and puts a real smile on your face. Sounds fantastic too!

Sales pitch over :lol:


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2017 1:53 pm 
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Location: North East
Some moderns will survive as the electrics are repairable. There are quite a few small business' about who will test and repair ECUs and control units.

http://www.ecu-repairs.com/

And you can still buy a lambda sensor for a 1984 VW Santana (when did you last see one of those)

http://www.mister-auto.co.uk/en/lambda- ... g3922.html

As with cars all through history, it is the perceived value, desirability and prestige that will keep them alive. What will kill most moderns off is the shear ugliness of them.


By the way BMW still own the Riley name, so I guess the next time they want to do a posh MINI they will stick a R-R grille on the front, stick a boot on the back and call it the Elf.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2017 7:56 pm 
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Location: Abingdon Oxfordshire
Of ECU's etc etc. As I understand it, they will repair and overhaul just so long as the individual internal components are available. But as soon as they ain't, that it! Similar thing happened with my boiler ECU, a Glow-worm. No internals for the now faulty control unit thinggy. Yep, before you suggest it......., tried this and that, internet, kicked the tyres, wound the windows up and down.............


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2017 7:58 pm 
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Classic MPI Mini enthusiasts should be ok into the future as Specialist Components seem to have developed a mappable engine management system for them.....
http://twinkam.co.uk/epages/191f6b26-60 ... ucts/SC220

and the Megajolt ECU system seems popular with many Mini modifiers today and suggests there will always be someone out there who can supply a suitable 'electronic sensor/software module' as a replacement for something which has gone obsolete from the original car manufacturer:-
http://www.trigger-wheels.com/store/con ... k/p98.html


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2017 8:11 pm 
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surfblue63 wrote:
By the way BMW still own the Riley name, so I guess the next time they want to do a posh MINI they will stick a R-R grille on the front, stick a boot on the back and call it the Elf.


From Autocar magazine (April 2016)

MINI saloon to be fifth model in new-look range
"The fifth model in Mini’s new-look range is likely to be a saloon as part of its global push upmarket, Autocar understands.
The new model could even, in theory, result in a return of the Riley name, for which BMW owns the trademark.
Although there’s no official confirmation of the addition of a saloon to the Mini range, sources have revealed that it is on the cards as part of Mini’s new look and ethos and the brand’s next logical evolution.
In its third generation of models under BMW ownership, Mini has pledged to focus on making five distinct model lines.

Mystery has previously surrounded the fifth model line since BMW’s board member with responsibility for Mini, Peter Schwarzenbauer, first spoke of the five ‘superheroes’ plan in 2014.
But Autocar now understands it will be a saloon, targeted mainly at the North American and Chinese markets but available globally.
Speaking to Autocar at the recent New York motor show, vice-president of Mini product management Ralph Mahler didn’t confirm plans for a saloon directly but did reveal that Mini had undertaken all sorts of analysis on different market trends and segments.
He said: “For example, in Asia and the US, the sedan [saloon] segment is very big. This is very interesting to us, of course.”
He said heritage was important for Mini and noted the firm had a history of making saloons with Riley Elf and Wolseley Hornet models, although he admitted most modern Mini buyers would not know this.
“The sedan concept is in our history,” he said. “So we have roots there. We have to look at it in a factual way. Customers may know of the strong heritage of the sedan concept, but it was never [sold in] big volumes. Most customers would hardly know that, so would they link to heritage?”
Mahler said history was very important to Mini as a whole. “Heritage is our core,” he said. “It will play a huge role and it’s a question our customers will always ask.”

As for the saloon’s name, the Riley connection to Mini is an intriguing one.
BMW still owns the trademarks to Riley and Triumph after the break-up and sale of the MG Rover group in 2000.
Naming the new saloon ‘Riley’ would be a nod to the history of a Mini saloon but, if used, the Riley name would be a model rather than a brand in its own right.
The new Clubman is likely to provide the basis for the Mini saloon, with the pair sharing a 2670mm wheelbase and bodywork from the B-pillars forward.
A unique rear-end design would accommodate the three-box saloon look. Expect a length of around 4300mm, which would still make it one of the smallest saloons on sale, because Mini’s desire is always to make the smallest car in a segment.
As part of the concentration on five core models, the Coupé, Roadster and Paceman will not be replaced.
Mahler said: “Since we’re a small car brand, selling 338,000 units last year, we have to remain focused and prioritise customers wanting different characters and concepts. We try to get it all very separate. The Paceman and Countryman are really close together and, in the future, we would rather split them apart.”
https://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/new- ... look-range

It seems a great shame that BL/Rover/BAe British management & their marketing people never saw the full potential in the heritage of the Mini (and Riley!) in later years (apart from the much belated 1990's Cooper re-introduction) or used it to build and sell reliable cars that people wanted to buy. Sadly it seems BMW's German management & marketing were needed to show how it could be done successfully with patience and a long term investment plan in new models...


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2017 11:35 pm 
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Tim wrote:
They can't use 1500, that would be the equivalent of calling it 'Maxi'. :lol:
Tim


According to the book 'New MINI' by Graham Robson (2002) when the Rover Spritual & Spritual Too concepts were presented at a secret meeting to BMW directors at Gaydon in 1995 as possible Mini replacements....(Spiritual was a small 3 door & Spiritual Too a larger 5 door) there was an amusing clash of cultures. Apparently when the Spritual twins were first shown to the Germans, Rover suggested that if the smaller car was to be the new Mini, then the larger version should be a Midi. The Germans not realising what they were saying, said: 'No, not Midi it needs to be Maxi......and they could not understand why the British Rover team all collapsed with laughter and took some time to regain their composure....they then had to explain the awful reputation that the Maxi name had gained for BL with many British car buyers in the 1970's. :lol:


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 17, 2017 11:38 pm 
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Australia's version of the Maxi was the the 1500/Nomad, an ADO16 variant with the E-Series engine. Leyland Australia went on to replace it with the Marina...

Tim

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