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PostPosted: Thu Sep 07, 2017 11:21 am 
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I have posted this before, but many years ago.

Please check out the Bluebird Project. The ongoing restoration of Donald Campbell's Jet Hydroplane Bluebird K7.

K7 took off in Jan 1967 killing the pilot.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4xemKc2In5Y

The boat was recovered about 20 years ago now & is being restored to full running order. Whether you "approve" of the restoration of this wonderful boat, it's hard to take issue with the standard of the workmanship.

http://www.bluebirdproject.com/bbp/

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 07, 2017 11:30 am 
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Been following this as soon as I found it.

My father worked at Dunlop at the time and was part of the team setting out course marker buoys right up until the last 'run'.

In the family album there are pages of pictures of the K7 at rest and in action, DC and his black poodle. There is an autographed picture of DC and his poodle sitting on the bonnet of his E type.

For some reason I think his poodle was called Lu Lu but it is a while since I saw the picture.


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 07, 2017 11:45 am 
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I spent many happy summers as a kid staying a Pier Cottage where DC used to launch K7. Right up until the mid 1980's K7's carrying cradle was still up there.

The person we stayed with, Arthur Wilson, helped out on most of the runs & was one of the few people there who saw the Christmas day runs of 1966, where DC unofficially broke 300 mph.

Arthur's stories really sparked my imagination as a kid.

When I was little I knew pretty much exactly where the wreckage was left, as did anyone local, it was marked with a Buoy. The rope was only cut when Bill Smith & his mates started sniffing about in the 1990's. I personally don't think the boat should have been lifted, but it was, I then didn't think it should be restored, but it is being. That taken as read, I think the job they are doing of the restoration is stunning & to see it planing across Coniston somewhere north of 150 mph would be a site to see!

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 07, 2017 12:53 pm 
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smithyrc30 wrote:

Been following this as soon as I found it.



Ditto.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 07, 2017 9:27 pm 
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I've been a fan of DC ever since I first heard the story of what happened back in 67. I wasn't born until 9 years after, so I sort out as much info as I could as a young lad.

I've followed this site (BBP) since very early on, and check out the picture of the day, everyday.

I've read quite a few books about the REAL early speed hero's, but in my mind DC stands above them all. Not because of what happened that cold January morning immortalising him. But because of what he achieved and how he did it, with the long shadow of his highly regarded farther hanging over him.

He's my top hero, I even named my son after him.

Shame he was never knighted.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 08, 2017 8:41 am 
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Couldn't agree more Stu, DC was having "Boys own adventures" in an era where people were only really interested in Astronauts & pop stars. He was a man out of his time, with his "stiff upper lip" & gritty determination in the face of almost insurmountable obstacles. The type of person who "Made the Empire Great" similar in many ways to Captain Scott. He was one of the last of the sort of people who were, to a great extent, killed off by the 1st half of the 20th century.

Image

I find it fascinating how he went from National Hero in the mid 50's to total anachronism by the time he died in 1967. I guess the world had just moved on.

I feel sure that his prime driving motivation was the relationship he had with his father. Which from everything I have read was far from healthy. He seemed to spend all his life trying to prove to his (dead) Dad that he was worthy of the family name. Very sad really.

Image

Although I don't think for one second that he set out to "kill himself" in Jan 1967, I personally think that it was only ever going to end like that at some point. He was never going to end his days sitting in an old folks home gazing out of the window.

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 08, 2017 2:50 pm 
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I Can't agree, or add anymore to your post.

We all to some extent try to make our farther a proud, and wait for that "Well done son" speech.

I fear I met one of these young chaps this week at work.

I was tasked to look after a work experience lad, who has a very well know daredevil farther.
I couldn't help but think the way he spoke, how much he reminded me of DC, not in the stiff upper lip manner, but in the relationship DC had with MC.

The way he spoke about him, I think this lad absolutely idolises his farther, to the extent that everytime I tried talking about, or trying to teach him how to do the job in hand. His response was to talk about his farther, where they had been, who they had met and how his farther was better than anyone else, this lad just didn't seem to be leading his own life.

Yes his farther is a very impressive talent, but I couldn't help worrying for the lad, especially when the real world kicks in once he's out of education.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 08, 2017 5:11 pm 
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mk1 wrote:

I feel sure that his prime driving motivation was the relationship he had with his father.

He seemed to spend all his life trying to prove to his (dead) Dad that he was worthy of the family name. Very sad really.

He was never going to end his days sitting in an old folks home gazing out of the window.









turbocox wrote:

I Can't agree, or add anymore to your post.

We all to some extent try to make our farther a proud, and wait for that "Well done son" speech.




I can relate to all of the above - think many of us can, it was not easy after I lost my Father when I was just 24 year,s old.

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 08, 2017 5:51 pm 
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Location: Up north where men are men and sheep are frightened
Bluebird and Donald Campbell feature here in Cumbria on TVs local new programs quite often when it's an anniversary of his crash or progress Bluebirds rebuild. It always amazes me how basic the engineering was to attempt to travel at such speeds.He was a very brave man. When I was a boy his attempts to break speed records were always covered as main news stories and to people it was a main topic of conversation. We had pleasant happy news stories then not all violence doom and gloom, he was a man that made us proud to be British we could do with a few more like him.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2017 7:51 pm 
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Sir Malcolm Campbell's Bluebird put though her paces for first time in 80 years
"Yesterday Sir Malcolm’s K3 hit speeds of 52 mph as part of a set of test runs on Bewl Water, in Kent.
Not quite the 130.91mph reached by the speedboat on August 17, 1938, but impressive all the same for a craft that just a few years ago was lying in bits on a workshop floor."
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/09 ... t-time-80/


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