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 Post subject: Brake Master Cylinders
PostPosted: Tue Mar 21, 2017 9:57 am 
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Joined: Thu Mar 24, 2011 9:04 am
Posts: 164
Location: Sweden
Thought I would share a bit of 'trivia' about the Lockheed brake master cylinders.

-By the way: The company started as Automotive Products (it went through various versions of the name).
Lockheed was the trade-name for brakes,
and Borg and Beck for clutches.
-Actually both started as licenced production of designs from USA.

At times parts were labelled as 'Lockheed', 'Borg and Beck' or AP.
-AP was quite a large company with various divisions (Aircraft -making landing gear; Filters -air and oil; Springs; and Rubbers -all the seals and hoses)
They also sold parts under various names (I won't mention "GT Auto" -this was all the lowest quality stuff.. :oops: )


Anyway. Master cylinders:
The "tin-tank" type m/cyl had some interesting processes.
The main body of the cylinder (the one-piece type, not the early ones with the screwed end-cap) was produced by 'cold-extrusion'.
-Starting with a lump of steel approx 50mm diameter and 50mm long, a long punch pushed the lump of steel down into a hole in the die and formed the cylinder in one 'shot'. This was done cold -hence the name.
-Though the formed cylinder was too hot to hold when it came out of the tool (obviously, a lot of energy was put into it...!).

The cylinder was then bored to the required diameter, and the open end was threaded with a fine thread. -The flange was screwed into place and swaged to lock it there.
The 2 holes: the larger 'by-pass port', and the small 'cut-off port' were then machined.

The cut-off port was part-drilled from the outside, BUT not all the way through. It was then pierced outwards from inside the bore. -This ensured that this hole (that the seal passes over) did not have a 'sharp' edge (the radius on the corner of the hole was small!)


So, there you go... A bit of useless information.. :D :D


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 21, 2017 11:04 am 
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Joined: Sun Nov 28, 2010 8:39 pm
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Very interesting but how do you know this info? Did you own the company? :lol:


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 21, 2017 11:20 am 
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Joined: Thu Jun 24, 2010 11:30 am
Posts: 8283
Location: Oop North where it's dark & cold nearly all the time.
Thanks for that Andy, very interesting.

_________________
Mark F

1933 MG J2
1943 Willys MB
1961 Morris 850
1963 Minisprint
1965 Speedwell S
1965 Hornet
1967 Austin Cooper S
1968 Terrapin
1968 Downton Tuned 1300 MK2


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 21, 2017 11:25 am 
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Joined: Mon May 07, 2012 6:10 am
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Location: Big Red, Australia
Hardly useless!

Many thanks for sharing this bit of info and I find it quite interesting, especially this bit

andy1071 wrote:

The cut-off port was part-drilled from the outside, BUT not all the way through. It was then pierced outwards from inside the bore. -This ensured that this hole (that the seal passes over) did not have a 'sharp' edge (the radius on the corner of the hole was small!)



Something that the guys fitting sleeve to cylinders have trouble with and thinking more about it, I see why and how they go wrong. Regardless of how the bore maybe finished if drilled, there'd always be an edge to ruin the seal.

Cheers :)


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 21, 2017 1:27 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 24, 2011 9:04 am
Posts: 164
Location: Sweden
Thanks for the positive feedback.

No, I didn't own the company.. ! :lol:
I did my apprenticeship there, and had lots of relatives there (sometimes I think at least half of them were there...) :)

They did have some interesting ideas:
They designed and made the automatic gearbox for the A-Series (apparently, they had enough room in the casing to make it 5-speed. But that would have been too unusual at the time -it was very unusual to have such a small engine with an auto box, not to mention that it had 4 speeds..) (I think I've mentioned this before...?)

Also Harry Webster (from triumph Cars) joined the company and invented the double-clutch gearbox.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 21, 2017 1:55 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jun 24, 2010 7:08 pm
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Location: London/Surrey
Thanks for posting......do any of your relatives who worked their have any photos of the production process or machinery used? Also do you know if the same process is used on the Mini master cylinders available today and are they made on the original tooling?

Sorry for all the questions but can you perhaps confirm some of the change over points/years when the changes occured from the older types of 'Hex Nut' cylinders with metal caps, plastic caps, etc. that have previously been posted?

Finally are the reproduction early 'Hex Nut' cylinders that I have seen around for very early Mini's still available from someone?


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 21, 2017 4:10 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 24, 2011 9:04 am
Posts: 164
Location: Sweden
No photos I'm afraid.. -Those were the days before mobiles, and you couldn't carry cameras around in factories...

I'm don't think the modern parts are made from original tooling, but I don't know for sure, sorry.

you would have to look at the BMC parts catalogues for the change dates.
It was a bit before my time... I started my apprenticeship in '77. -When old Minis were just old Minis.... (shock, horror :shock: :shock: )
I got my first Mini that year, a late '59 car (registered Jan '60) to restore/learn on. And there was no interest in it.. (other than from me, of course... :D ) -Wish I had it now...


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