Clock lubrication

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Ronnie
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Joined: Fri Jun 25, 2010 5:37 pm
Location: N/E England Where the SAND is GOLDEN and the sea is always COLD!!

Re: Clock lubrication

Post by Ronnie »

Watchmakers use oilers different diameter wires in effect as small as 0.18mm more like the hair used by Peter (I bet it was curly :oops: :D ) depending on the size of the movement.
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Peter Laidler
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Joined: Sat Jul 15, 2017 5:35 pm
Location: Abingdon Oxfordshire

Re: Clock lubrication

Post by Peter Laidler »

Made me chuckle Ronnie!!!!! Looking back, our old VERTEX watches were good old plodders but the well respected ETERNAs were notorious for breaking the balance staff after a half decent knock! Couldn't get spare easily either.
Dr S
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Joined: Wed May 28, 2014 1:06 pm
Location: Lakeland

Re: Clock lubrication

Post by Dr S »

Whilst we are being horoligical. I have a few clocks to rebuild at home.
I have a 3 or 4 Heuer 7700’s for the dash and a halda speed master. All of which are gummed up with hard grease / goo.
What’s the right approach for getting them clean? Is there a spray solvent answer? Or or is it strip them to parts and scrub?
I've got a 69 Mini with a 1046, Cooper Head and a four on the floor.
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Peter Laidler
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Joined: Sat Jul 15, 2017 5:35 pm
Location: Abingdon Oxfordshire

Re: Clock lubrication

Post by Peter Laidler »

The clock part is probably simple enough. It's the other parts that are driven off the clock train that complicate things. Things such as multiple dials, times of the tides in Nui Dat and how to find longitude in Swahili....

To clean ours we would put the whole lot, totally stripped down to the last piece into a glass part filled with isoprophyl alcohol - or was it ether...., You could use meths but it took longer to clean as I recall.......anyway..... Let the parts sit for a few minutes and then run your finger around the edge of the glass to make it ring for a minute or so, driving the rest of the instrument teccies mad. Lo and behold the vibration would clean every part of the wristwatch. Lift the parts out and the cleaner would simply evaporate leaving no residue, just gleaming steel or nickel parts, ready to assemble.
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