'Right to repair' law to come in this summer......

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mab01uk
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'Right to repair' law to come in this summer......

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The 'Right to repair' law to come in this summer......
"Appliances such as fridges, washing machines and TVs should last longer and be cheaper to run under new rules. Ministers have confirmed that from the summer consumers will have a right to repair on goods they buy. They are keeping a promise to implement EU rules aimed at cutting energy and bills – and reducing the need for new materials. Many consumers have complained that goods don’t last long enough, then can’t be fixed in the home. Manufacturers will be legally obliged to make spare parts for products available to consumers for the first time – a new legal right for repairs.
The aim of the new rules is to extend the lifespan of products by up to 10 years. The new rules will be estimated to reduce the 1.5 million tonnes of electrical waste said by the government to be generated in the UK each year and to contribute to reducing carbon emissions overall. Business and Energy Secretary Kwasi Kwarteng said: "Our plans to tighten product standards will ensure more electrical goods can be fixed rather than thrown on the scrap heap."
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-56340077

'Planned obsolescence' it all started with light bulbs?
Greater sums of money could be reaped, companies figured, by making bulbs disposable and putting replacement costs onto customers. Thus was born the infamous “Phoebus cartel” in the 1920s, wherein representatives from top light bulb manufacturers worldwide, such as Germany’s Osram, the United Kingdom’s Associated Electrical Industries, and General Electric (GE) in the United States (via a British subsidiary), colluded to artificially reduce bulbs’ lifetimes to 1,000 hours. The details of the scam emerged decades later in governmental and journalistic investigations. “This cartel is the most obvious example” of planned obsolescence’s origins “because those papers have been found,” says Giles Slade, author of the book Made to Break: Technology and Obsolescence in America, a history of the strategy and its consequences.
The practice cropped up in all sorts of other industries, too. For instance, competition between General Motors and Ford in the fledging 1920s auto market led the former to introduce the now-familiar model year changes in its vehicles. GM had pioneered a way to entice customers to splurge on the latest, greatest car, to satisfy themselves and impress those in their social circles. “It was a model for all industry,” says Slade. Although the term “planned obsolescence” didn’t enter common usage until the 1950s, the strategy had by then permeated consumerist societies.
In various forms, from subtle to unsubtle, planned obsolescence still very much exists nowadays. From so-called contrived durability, where brittle parts give out, to having repairs cost more than replacement products, to aesthetic upgrades that frame older product versions as less stylish – goods makers have no shortage of ruses to keep opening customers’ wallets.
For a fully modern example, consider smartphones. These handsets often get discarded after a mere couple years’ use. Screens or buttons break, batteries die, or their operating systems, apps, and so on can suddenly no longer be upgraded. Yet a solution is always near at hand: brand new handset models, pumped out every year or so, and touted as “the best ever”.
As another example of seemingly blatant planned obsolescence, Slade mentions printer cartridges. Microchips, light sensors or batteries can disable a cartridge well before all its ink is actually used up, forcing owners to go buy entirely new, not-at-all-cheap units. “There’s no real reason for that,” Slade says. “I don’t know why you can’t just go get a bottle of cyan or black [ink] and, you know, squirt it into a reservoir.”
https://www.bbc.com/future/article/2016 ... ce-of-tech
jay weinstein
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Re: 'Right to repair' law to come in this summer......

Post by jay weinstein »

Good idea but most people have few tools and can barely change
a roll of toilet paper.
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111Robin
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Re: 'Right to repair' law to come in this summer......

Post by 111Robin »

What about legislation to ensure that you keep your item for at least 10 years ?.
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MiNiKiN
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Re: 'Right to repair' law to come in this summer......

Post by MiNiKiN »

jay weinstein wrote: Sat Mar 27, 2021 8:21 pm Good idea but most people have few tools and can barely change
a roll of toilet paper.
The great sideeffect of this is, that it will stimulate the founding of new local repair shops who offer repairs as a service. No need to DIY (that was never the aim anyway, I reckon). So even if a product is produced in far flung country, the repair will generate local revenue.
If only I knew the power of the Dark Side...I wouldn't have made contact with an Innocenti :mrgreen:
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